Metal Detector Reviews

Bounty HunterCobraDetectorProFisherGarrettMinelabMP DigitalPredatorTitanViperWhite'sAll PurposeBeachGoldRelic$50 to $199.99$200 to $399.99$400 to $599.99$600 to $799.99$800 to $999.99$1000 to $100000
Garrett Sea Hunter Mark II
*****
Andrew Maben writes "I did a little research on underwater / water proof metal detector. I ended up purchasing a sea hunter..."
Garrett ACE 250
****
Robert Loren writes "I bought myself a Christmas Gift, in 2005, of a Treasure Ace 250 from Kellyco after doing some research..."
Viper Viper Trident
*****
Bill writes "I bought this detector as "refurbished," and found coins and rings up to 10 inches deep on beach sand...."
White's DFX
*****
Dwayne Kelley writes "I have always had an interest in metal detecting, but never put that interest to physical use until recently...."
Minelab Musketeer Advantage Pro
****
Gunnar Rasmussen writes "I had been looking for a low khz detector because the lower the kiloherz the deeper it will find coins..."
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*****7 Reviews
****2 Reviews
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Metal Detector Reviews

  Total # Reviews = 9
  Average Rating = 4.78 / 5

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
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49 of 127 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Brenda Milliken
User Experience:
7+ years
Submitted on:
Apr 1, 2008
User Rating:
****


Some women lose their husbands to other women others to professional sports like football. Well back in the early seventies I felt like I was losing my husband to his new hobby metal detecting.

If he wasn't working or at home which wasn't that often in the summer he was always out metal detecting. He would come home day after day showing me what he had found that day. With stories about how he had almost missed a coin because it was so deeply buried or maybe because it was setting on edge and he wasn't getting a good signal.

When the bitter cold of winter set in and he was know longer able to use his detector he was like like a little boy who had lost his best friend. Through the winter I devised a plan that I thought would get us back together again in the summer.

I thought if you can't beat them join them! Unknown to him I took the coins and jewelry he had found that summer cashed them in and bought my own detector.

Thirty years ago detectors weighed six or seven pounds that didn't sound like much but within three hours my shoulder was killing me and I had to call it quits. As I walked off that grassy field I saw that I told you so look on my husband face. However the next day I was back out there even if I was sore.

By summer's end I could stay out as long as he did. today most detectors are only two to three pounds. Until my husband had a stroke thirty years later up until then we were a common sight around town swinging our detectors.

We enjoyed coin hunting the best and have found that what they say about a place never being hunted out is true. We have come back to parks or old school yards years after we thought they were cleaned out and found more coins and jewelry. Until he had a stroke we bought a new detector whenever a new model came out.
Brenda Milliken
Cambridge,, Oh

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204 of 210 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Skip Robinson
User Experience:
7+ years
Submitted on:
Apr 4, 2008
User Rating:
*****


I can't tell you how many forum posts inquire what kind of mid priced metal detector prospecting enthusiasts should purchase for finding all types of gold.

The White's GMT was designed to do just that!

With a price that won't break your bank the GMT is a highly praised instrument. Equipped with headphone jack, external speaker and easy to read LCD screen the GMT is the perfect tool in the arsenal of the modern prospector. It is extremely sensitive to small gold so it allows you to find placer pockets and follow placer pay streaks with it's low profile, narrow, 5" by 10" DD coil. A unique quality of the GMT is to analyze potential gold targets by analyzing target iron content.

A lower percentage of iron in a reactive target raises the probability it's gold! The GMT will follow those black sand deposits so important to the prospector and analyze their iron content and alert you when there is gold!. I have detected gold down to half a flake with my GMT and the it goes wild for single pickers. Troubled by those nasty hot rocks your GMT will help identify them and reduce your digging.

The ability to analyze iron content also make the GMT a great meteorite hunter. In the middle of a black rock strewn lava field near Stanton, Arizona I found my first meteorite as big a a lime. Another troublesome condition facing the prospector is ground balancing in high iron content soils. The GMT was designed to compensate for these conditions and excells.

I have used the GMT in the gold rush area of Northern California and as far North as the Nome region of Alaska and found the GMT quite at home in those high mineralized soils. Incorporating automatic or manual tuning features make the GMT a gold grabbing machine with excellent sensitivity to all sizes of gold with an easy to understand control box with startup presets.

The GMT is also economic to operate as you can receive up to 40 operation hours on 8 AA batteries that slide in and out of the control box in a easy to use slide battery holder. The White's GMT will not disapoint you as it meets your gold prospecting needs!
Skip Robinson
Ventura, Ca

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133 of 135 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Larry Raymer
User Experience:
4-6 years
Submitted on:
Mar 17, 2008
User Rating:
*****


I have been Metal Detecting for about five years now, and I've used many different types from Bounty Hunter to Minelab. I now own a White's GMT DD and if you hunt for gold you can't go wrong with this detector. It's pretty much a turn on and go detector.

The most useful feature in my opinion is the auto ground balance. I just turn it on pump the coil a few times, and wallah your all set to start detecting! For those of you who like to manually adjust your ground balance; this is the easiest machine I have ever had the privilege to operate. The second nice thing I like is the iron discrimination. I have found that when the White's GMT DD tells you there is a 70% or more chance that your target is iron, it really is! I usually wouldn't dig a target with that high of a percentage, but with anything less you better believe I'll start digging.

The White's GMT DD is very user friendly and also light weight. It only takes four AA's batteries while still lasting many hours. It hasn't failed me yet, but I always take extra batteries just in case it finally runs out of juice.

I live in the dessert and my main hobby is detecting for gold. The penetrating power of this detector is amazing! It has detected some tiny nuggets that I didn't think were possible to get a signal from, but they are in my gold vile and seeing is believing. I have also picked up some nice size loud and clear nuggets, a mercury dime, and even an old Army can dump (along with some of their can openers and such.)

So, if you are in the market for a gold detector and then some, White's has priced this detector within reach for a lot of us folks that cant afford a $4000 detector. You wont be disappointed.
Larry Raymer
Bullhead City, Az

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86 of 94 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
James Papas
User Experience:
6 months to 2 years
Submitted on:
Apr 8, 2008
User Rating:
*****


My White's GMT has been reliable and easy to use. I did read the entire instruction book that I got online before my detector arrived. I also used it the first few times I used the GMT. The battery life is amazing, the batteries last a very long time. I live in a remote area, so the headphones are not needed, but help and keep your ears warm in the winter. The interesting feature about this metal detector is that you can track black sand. In my creek, the smaller gold is unusually in or under black sand deposits.

The operation is simple, and I found it does balance well. We have lots of hot rocks, I mean lots. I think the worst obstacle for me had been getting past them. I know this will come with experience, but I still want to dig. I found 1 20 gram gold nugget on my property the 3rd day I used the GMT. I was told that someone 8 years ago found 2 8 ounce nuggets on my little mountain, so there could be more. I would like to purchase another detector, one for treasure too.

I will probably get the one that shows what object is underground before you dig. I have had other metal detectors and they went through batteries fast. I can work for a couple of weeks easy using headphones and batteries are still good. It even finds gold! Have fun!

James Papas
Coulterville, Ca

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68 of 68 people found this review helpful:

Review by:
Anonymous
User Experience:
7+ years
Submitted on:
Jul 21, 2010
User Rating:
*****


Hi,

I've used both units extensively and still own both.

If I want to hit the smallest gold possible, I'll be using the Gold Bug 2 with a 6" coil. The GMT is close but the GB2 has the edge for small gold.

However, the GMT gets much better depth in hot ground on large nuggets than the GB2. For overall performance I think the GMT has a better balance of both small and large gold performance. I'm generally willing to pass on sub-grain gold to get better depth on larger gold. I'm not saying the GMT will not hit sub-grain gold as it will quite easily. I'm just saying the stuff I can get with the GB2 that the GMT can't is very tiny indeed.

I guess which raises the question of why I'd care to use the GB2. Well, when checking hardrock quartz samples even a flyspeck can indicate rich gold ore. And when using the detector as a replacement for a gold pan, again, even a flyspeck can tell me I might want to set up a highbanker. The GB2 excels at these uses.

They both have dramatically different iron rejection capabilities, both with pluses and minuses. The GB2 uses a iron rejection system that basically ignores iron targets. The GMT always signals iron, but indicates via a meter the probability the item may be ferrous. If the probability is high enough, you also get an audio indication.

The issue is that in many soils a very small or very deep nugget at the edge of detection depth will often signal as iron. If you have the iron disc engaged on the GB2 and pass over such a nugget, the machine will ignore it, and you'll never know anything was under the coil. So the smart way to hunt with the Gb2 is to hunt in all metal, then engage the disc to check the target. If it reads iron, knock off some soil and try again. If it still reads iron, it probably is. But in some rare cases the target that initially read as iron will now read as non-ferrous.

The problem in really trashy sites though is that it is tempting to just hunt in iron disc mode. I've done it myself. But there is the risk of passing on nuggets when you do that.

The GMT will always tell you there is a target. Its meter is honest in reflecting probability as you never get a 100% iron or 100% gold reading. The machine always tells you there is doubt. If it reads 50%, well, I'm willing to take a 50-50 chance on digging a nugget. With the GMT the thing to do on questionable targets is again remove some soil. If the iron probability increases, you are closing in on iron. If it decreases, things are looking better that it is non-ferrous. For most uses the GMT system is the superior system.

But when you get into intense hot rocks the GMT can drive you nuts. The rocks often read iron and register with the audio iron "grunt". But try listening to grunt-grunt-grunt every swing while waiting for a beep. Tiring. With the GB2 you kick it into iron disc, and most hot rocks are simply ignored leading to much quieter operation. Again, a nugget may read ferrous and be ignored. But I still find the GB2 preferable in this type of circumstance.

I not only use detectors but I'm also a multi-line dealer. I get to talk to lots of users. And ease of use is a big factor. The fact is the Gold Bug 2 must be mastered to be of use. There are lots of people that simply have trouble with manual ground balance detectors like the GB2. I have found that the GMT is the safer bet for most beginners as it offers both automatic and manual ground balance. The automatic GB is a safety net for the new user and even a pro will find it of use in wilding varying ground conditions. But as the machine is mastered the option still exists to manually fine tune the ground balance. This one thing alone would lead me to recommend the GMT if the unit is a persons first gold machine.

But like I said, I have to have both. Another thing I like about the Gold Bug 2 is that it can be hip or chest mounted. Great for long hours or working in deep water.

Many people do not know that the same engineer worked on both units. Dave Johnson was at Fisher when he had the major hand in designing the Gold Bug 2. And he was hired by White's many years later to work on the GMT, which is the newer of the two designs. The way I look at it one is not a Fisher and the other a White's - they are both Dave Johnson detectors. As is the Tesoro Lobo ST. Which is why I get a chuckle out of people doing the this brand versus that brand thing. They are more similar than they are different and in good hands you can't go wrong with any of them.

Steve Herschbach

Anonymous

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